Us Mexico Social Security Totalization Agreement

On April 14, 2021 by heart

A list of countries with which the United States currently has totalization agreements and copies of these agreements can be accessed under U.S. international social security agreements. The most notable exception to the territorial rule is called a detached work rule. Under this rule, a worker whose employer requires his temporary relocation from one country to another to work for the same company continues to pay social security contributions and retains insurance coverage exclusively in the country from which he has moved.1 According to almost all totalization agreements, the duration of such a transfer cannot be expected at the time of the transfer. to exceed 5 years. This rule ensures that workers who work only temporarily in the other country continue to work in their home country, which remains the country of their greatest economic link.2 On the other hand, workers who change countries permanently are insured under the country of destination regime. By mutual agreement, the two countries can agree to extend the five-year period for temporary missions abroad on a case-by-case basis, but extensions beyond two more years are rare. Applications should include the name and address of the employer in the United States and the other country, the full name, place and date of birth of the worker, nationality, U.S. and foreign Social Security numbers, location and date of employment, and the start and end date of the assignment abroad. (If the employee works for a foreign subsidiary of the U.S. company, the application should also indicate whether U.S. Social Security Insurance has been agreed upon for employees of the related company pursuant to Section 3121 (l) of the internal income code.) Self-employed workers should indicate their country of residence and the nature of their self-employment. When applying for certificates under the agreements with France and Japan, the employer (or non-employee) must also indicate whether the worker and accompanying family members are covered by health insurance.

Since the late 1970s, the United States has concluded international social security agreements that the United States coordinates.

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